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Terrible Shoppers In Second Life and What They do

All stores have them in Second Life: Terrible shoppers! What makes them? How do they turn into terrible customers? Why is that happening? In this article I will try explain why this phenomena is so popular in the grid. No, sorry, just kidding. ?? I will just make fun of the situation. Nothing more.

I’m pretty sure you can’t be one of those terrible clients in Second Life. My Bad! lol. Keep reading if you are interested. If not, consider yourself clickbaited.

I’ve Got Your Number

One of the multiple issues Second Life has among residents is the Instant Messaging System. This is an open world. For practical purposes, it is just like if anybody knew your private number. Everybody can call you and send you a message.

Yes! even if your profile is hidden, that won’t stop an asshole from finding the way to send you an offline message. Don’t be so arrogant to think it is not possible, IT IS. Period.

Have you ever wondered what would happen if everybody had the number of Tim Cook (CEO of Apple)? I can tell you right now: CEOS would be invisible and anonymous accounts.

At the end of the day, it is so easy to contact the creator in a store, unless they block you. You can call, complain, say thank you etc. Terrible shoppers in Second Life do that all the time.

and Every Terrible Shopper Has an Opinion

While contacting someone to say “I bought this item, and I love it” is rare, it’s also highly appreciated. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not something common, but you get one of those from time to time.

On the other hand, terrible shoppers in Second Life need to show you their disdain. They always have something to say about your work. You are lucky, they vent their peeves in private. However, it’s much more common to write something on the marketplace just to prove you have an opinion.

Pick up any random store in Second Life. Browse a little bit and let the rage appear behind any 1 or 2 stars. Terrible shoppers never leave a 3 star review. Never. They need the warmth an attention a one star review can offer them in Second Life Marketplace.

and It’s Always Your Fault. Not Mine

Terrible customers contact you in Second Life, saying something like: “This thing ain’t working, how could you release this item. Too Bad”. Which is very different to say something like “I bought this, I have no idea how this works or I can’t make it work”. Last statement shows humility, another important virtue that many people lack in Second Life these days.

Just think about this for a minute. Put yourself in a creator’s shoes that has successfully designed more than 200 item and made more than 100 thousand real dollars. A customer sends you an IM “This item you made is wrong, not working blah blah”.

Instead of thinking, what could have I done wrong ? They think “The creator is clueless.” The sad part of this is that, most of the times, the answer to the problem is a 50 word paragraph written in a notecard with the product.

Reading is a Superpower These Days

People rarely read in their daily lives, why Second Life would be an exception? The grid is a visual world and it’s much more fun clicking on things like a gorilla than reading the boards.

Terrible shoppers all over the grid, prove Second Life is not for readers, nor writers. It’s always unsatisfying. When you write something, people never read it. When you forget to write something on a board or a sign, there is always a smart customer saying “I couldn’t find that explanation anywhere.”

? True Story: One day we added a script in the store at landing point. It was written: “Click here to get 50L$” With a traffic of 3000 on the plot daily, nobody clicked.

What Terrible Shoppers Do Inworld

Being combative, arrogant, stubborn, uneducated .. and I could go on. At the same time, I also think Second Life makes you feel suspicious, untrusting and many times in a bad mood for different reasons.

You can’t tell off Lindens, or complain to someone that can make things easier in Second Life. You can’t improve things.

Who can get your messages? The ones that actually work in Second Life: designers, creators and store owners. If you are one of those, then you become a target. At the end of the day, it goes with the job because you are making money.

Terrible shoppers in Second Life admire you, but it’s difficult for them to put those feelings into words. What you get is all of the above.

Featured Picture Credits:

Self-care means giving yourself permission to pause

Amigo

Amigo Uriza is the Cofounder of V-Twins Biker Outfitters in Second Life. These days he no longer runs the store. He is partially retired from the Metaverse

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